• Hitting The Slopes In Canada

    Jan 16, 2018

    Are you ready for ski and snowboard season? From east to west, Timbercreek brings you this list of the best places to hit the slopes this winter in Canada.

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    Alberta

    One of the premiere provinces for snow sports, Alberta has an abundance of snow, and mountains which means it offers a near equal abundance of ski and snowboard locations. From Calgary’s Olympic Park to Banff’s famous trio of Sunshine, Lake Louise, and Norquay, Jasper’s Marmot Basin, Castle Mountain and Pass Powderkeg, Nighthawk, Canyon, and Misery Mountain Ski Areas, it’s got to be one of the most skiable provinces in the country! Check out more here.

    Manitoba

    While not the first place you’d think of for ski and snowboard destinations, Manitoba rocks when it comes to snowsports. Holiday Mountain in La Riviere features a freestyle terrain snowboard park and 11 downhill runs. Stony Mountain Ski Area near Winnipeg is the city’s prime snow spot, priding itself on being the first to open and the last to close each winter. Springhill Winter Sports Park maintains 10 runs for boarders and skiers with night skiing for insomniacs, and snowboard and freestyle ski contests throughout the season. Asessippi Ski Area is the province’s largest, with 25 runs, two freestyle terrain parks, three aerial lifts and a bustling winter village. Ski Valley, Falcon Ridge, Ski Hill, and Mystery Mountain are other great options for the Manitoba ski lover.

    Ontario

    While Blue Mountain tends to rule the minds of most Ontario skiers and snowboarders, there are in fact numerous options in central Canada. Mount St. Louis Moonstone, Glen Eden, and Uplands Ski Centre tend to be the Toronto/Southern Ontario locations of choice for proximity, with Horseshoe and Hidden Valley, as well as Hockley Valley, Devil’s Elbow near Peterborough, Batawa near Belleville, and a laundry list of other fantastic spots like Laurentian, Caledon, Mt. Antoine, Sir Sam’s and Searchmont. For a mostly flat province, Ontario has some great ski hills.

    Quebec

    An Alberta-worthy snow competitor, Quebec has a lot to be proud of when it comes to ski and snowboard hotspots. Mont Tremblant is a world destination located north of Montreal, with Mont Sainte Anne and Le Massif close to Quebec City offering some of the best skiing (and the highest vertical drop) in Eastern Canada. Mont Saint-Sauveur is known for its world class night skiing, with Mont Sutton and Bromont high on that list as well.  Quebec is also filled with Nordic trails through The Gatineau Hills near Ottawa.

    Timbercreek hopes you find the ski and snowboard hills of your dreams this winter. For more information about Timbercreek Communities in your city, please visit our website.

  • Outdoor Adventure List

    Sep 19, 2017

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    Whether it’s camping, watersports, hiking, or an intercontinental trip, outdoor adventure is good for body and soul. Adventure is about taking risks, trying new things, and diving in with both feet. Whether it’s across the globe or in your own backyard, adventure awaits. To help you discover your inner explorer, Timbercreek brings you our outdoor adventure list.

    Camping

    Camping is key. From hikes to multi-day backcountry canoe trips, camping brings you back to nature, even if it’s in a car or an RV. Fresh air, sun and wind, water and woods. They cleanse the soul and ground the spirit. And it’s the kind of thing you don’t have to venture too far for. Even city folk can drive an hour or two, set up a tent, and bask in the rejuvenating energy of nature.

    Rock Climbing

    While this point involves considerable skill and also risk of death, it’s a great way to get outside and get your adrenaline pumping. Rock climbing is a sport that involves strength, technique, planning, and courage. It makes you face your fears, try new things, test your skills, and take chances. Best of all, it’s increasingly becoming available in unexpected like indoor climbing gyms.

    Watersports

    Adventure doesn’t have to imply distance. It’s as much a mental state as a physical activity. Doing something you don’t often do, or that can be done close by or in another medium (i.e. water), can instill a sense of exploration even in the middle of the city. Windsurfing, canoeing, swimming, kitesurfing, dragon boating, or paddle boarding: they all remove you from your normal environment and call on different skill sets. They also demand an immediate connection with nature - in these cases - with wind, water, sun, and sky.

    Road Trip

    From RVing to car camping and cross country marathons, road trips are what adventure is made of. Route 66, the Trans Canada, the Dempster highway -- roads are a symbol of freedom, the unknown, exploration, and travel. And cycling definitely counts as well. Multi-day cycling adventures can be just as exciting and promote a more direct and hands-on experience of a particular area.

    Pilgrimage

    A more extensive outdoor adventure, a pilgrimage in the style of Mecca, the Camino de Santiago, or visiting Stonehenge, is an adventure with purpose. With spiritual meaning and physical, outdoor components, an adventure of this sort combines the visceral aspect of moving through a new environment, with the mental component of experiencing new and unseen vistas.

    Timbercreek hopes this article gives you a few ideas for your own outdoor adventure this year. For more information about Timbercreek Communities in your city, please visit our website.

  • Fun & Cheap Summer Date Ideas

    Jul 10, 2017

    Whether you’re meeting someone new or celebrating an anniversary, great date ideas are always useful. Dating can be expensive but it doesn’t have to be. Timbercreek has some fun and cheap summer date ideas for you to enjoy with someone you love or someone new.

    iStock-596081514A Walk In The Park

    A stroll in the park is possibly the easiest and cheapest of all date ideas.  If the weather is working in your favour it can be a beautiful way to spend the day. Best of all, if you’re nervous you don’t have to look at each other constantly. Up the romance factor by bringing a blanket, some cups and something to drink. Sunset is a great time for your stroll.

    Wine Tasting Event

    In Ontario, the LCBO offers an affordable range of wine tasting events that range from $30 to $100. They also have beer and scotch tastings, as well as longer term 4 week courses. A wine or beer tasting is social, public, and gives you something to talk about with your date. The events are often held in the nice LCBO buildings (like Toronto’s Summerhill location).

    Brunch

    Meeting at night for the first time is often ill advised. A classic brunch out is a cheap and delicious date option not to be overlooked. Brunch is really popular in Canada so you’ll have no shortage of restaurant options to choose from. Check out the best places in Toronto for brunch here

    Happy Hour Drink(S)

    It’s hard to beat happy hour -- another inexpensive daytime date option to consider. Most pubs offer it and more and more craft beer bars are adding it to their rosters. Grab a seat and enjoy a $5 beer or a half price glass of wine with your date. Worst case scenario, you get a cheap drink out of it.

    Street Festival

    In summer, festivals and street events are great options for cheap dates. Many of these events in big cities are free and allow you to walk through a number of big city blocks that are closed to traffic. These fun events usually come with a ton of cheap or free food, beverages, and entertainment. There’s always lots to do and you won’t be locked into a full restaurant meal or long event.

    Jazz Show

    Live jazz, while not for everyone, is sophisticated, interesting, and fun to listen to and watch. Because it’s improvised you’ll get to hear something unique with every show. Going to a concert is a great date idea and takes the pressure off of making witty conversation. If the music is bad it also gives you something to commiserate over. Normally less than $20, a jazz show is a great way to spend a date.

    Coffee

    Who doesn’t like coffee? A coffee date is almost guaranteed to be cheap --  even at Starbucks where it’s only $4 for a latte. Best of all it gives you the option to sit and talk, or walk and talk. Coffee dates can be short and sweet, or be a starting point for a longer date. The best thing about them is their flexibility and low cost.

    Timbercreek hopes this list of cheap date ideas has inspired you to get out there. For more information about Timbercreek Communities in your city, please visit our website

  • Canada's 150 Celebrations

    Jun 21, 2017

    150 years ago, Canada became a Nation. 2017 marks a major milestone in our country’s history. And while celebrations have been under way since January, this summer is when the real parties will kick off. You don’t need to go far to find something happening -- almost every city in the country has put together a range of events to celebrate. From appreciating Canada’s vast natural landscape, to music and the arts, there’s something for everyone. Check out these great ways to celebrate our country’s 150th from Timbercreek.

    shutterstock_108091436Go to a National Park

    Parks Canada has stepped up to help ring in our 150th by offering free admission to National Parks across the country.  From BC to Newfoundland, our Nation’s vast landscape is free to explore for one year only. Check out the Parks Canada website for availability and regulations as the Discovery Pass covers park entrance, but not all fees like camping and guided tours. Learn more here.

    Get Active

    Challenge yourself with the ParticipACTION 150 Play List. It was created from the results of over 465,000 votes from people across Canada and includes 150 physical activities that make us uniquely Canadian. The Play List is a challenge to Canadians in communities, schools, workplaces, and even abroad to see how many different activities they can complete in 2017. Learn more here.

    The Maritimes

    Confederation happened in three stages starting in 1864. While it was initiated by the potential union of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and PEI, those provinces actually waited to join the rest of Canada until the third leaders’ meeting in 1867. As such the maritimes has a rich past and important role in the country’s history.  The east coast is also just a sensational part of the country, both in terms of natural beauty and cultural heritage. From New Brunswick’s flowerpot rocks to the Bay of Fundy, Halifax, and PEI’s red sand beaches, there’s a lot to do and see.  And, like across the rest of the country, there are no shortage of events and celebrations to make the most of our 150th in the Maritimes. Learn more here.

    Stay In Town

    There are fun activities to enjoy right in your own hometown this year if you want to celebrate Canada’s 150th close to home. Check out your city’s website for events and ideas. Most cities coast to coast are offering a wealth of spectacles all year long.

    Get out, enjoy and celebrate the great white north for its 150th!

    For more information about Timbercreek Communities in your city, please visit our website.  

  • Explore Canada with the 2017 Parks Canada Discovery Pass

    Apr 19, 2017

    It’s Canada’s 150th birthday this year! Celebrate living in one of the greatest countries in the world with a free 2017 Parks Canada Discovery Pass. As part of numerous activities celebrating our century and half birthday, Canadians can enter and explore Canada’s incredible National parks coast to coast, free of charge.

    iStock-94994231To participate in this amazing opportunity, we recommend that you order your pass online before your arrival for faster entry and greater convenience. Canadians can access all of Canada’s national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas operated by Parks Canada, including historic canals and waterways (including free lockage, a pass similar to the parks pass).

    Please keep in mind that regular fees still apply for other experiences and services including the following: camping, backcountry, and other accommodations, admission to Canadian Rockies Hot Springs, boat mooring, reservation fees, guided tours and hikes, and programs not usually included with admission, firewood, and backcountry overnight use.

    With spring’s arrival, and summer just around the corner, there’s no better way to celebrate our country’s birthday than by exploring its majestic landscape with a Parks Canada pass. With 46 national parks to choose from, Timbercreek Communities brings you this shortlist of our favourite national parks to visit in Canada.

    Banff National Park

    In the fall of 1883, three Canadian Pacific Railway construction workers stumbled across a cave containing hot springs on the eastern slopes of Alberta's Rocky Mountains. From that humble beginning Banff National Park was born, Canada's very first national park. Spanning 6,641 square kilometres of valleys, mountains, glaciers, forests, meadows and rivers, Banff National Park is one of the world's premier destinations. Get more info here.

    Bruce Peninsula National Park

    Bruce Peninsula National Park is an incredibly beautiful national park in Northern Ontario. It features rocky terrain, steep cliffs and panoramic views of the bright turquoise waters of Georgian Bay. The area is home to black bears and rare reptiles. The park is full of ancient cedar trees, orchids and ferns. If you plan to camp there, you’ll get a free show from the stars above in this Dark Sky Preserve.

    Kejimkujik National Park and Historic Site

    On the southern tip of Nova Scotia lies Kejimkujik, an old growth national park and historic site. There’s a bit of a debate about the name’s meaning, ranging from the Mi'kmaq translation for "attempting to escape" or "swollen waters", and the park's official stance that Kejimkujik is a Mi'kmaq word meaning "tired muscles". Either way, Kejimkujik’s hemlock, sugar maple, and yellow aspens, quartzite shores, and white sand beaches won’t disappoint. Paddle the waters, hike the trails and discover the rich diversity of Kejimkujik this summer. Learn more here.

    Point Pelee National Park

    For central Canadians, Point Pelee National Park is not to be missed. Located at Canada’s most southerly point, Pelee boasts a lush Carolinian forest oasis, complete with canoeable marshes, miles of boardwalk, and incredible wildlife. Point Pelee is full of songbirds in the spring, and the hum of cicadas in summer, it flutters with Monarchs in the fall and is a peaceful place to retreat inn  the winter. For wine lovers, the area is also home to numerous VQA wineries. See more here.

    Forillon National Park

    Forillon National Park is arguably one of the most breathtaking national parks in Canada. It offers the best of land and sea, featuring cliffs with jaw dropping ocean views and dense forest land. Located in Eastern Quebec near New Brunswick, Park Forillon is a great place to hike or go snorkelling and watch seals play.

    Take advantage of this incredible opportunity while you can.

    For more information on Timbercreek Communities across Canada, please visit our website.

  • Things Most People Don't Do When They Travel

    Mar 14, 2017

    Going somewhere that have never been means that you are forced to break your routine and live a little more in the present. Timbercreek Communities wants to help you make the most of these precious and special times. Here are a few things most people don’t do when they travel (but you should)!

    Plan Not to Overplan

    Many travellers have a list of the things they need to see and do during their stay and wind up with a rigid, jam-packed schedule that keeps them as busy on vacation as they are back at home. A trip should be relaxing, so keep your plans light and leave room for discovery. You may even want to plan a whole day with no plans. Let yourself slow down, look around and really explore where you are.

    Talk to the Locals

    If you only see the major tourist spots when you travel, you aren’t going to get a feel for what the destination is really like. The way to truly discover what your destination has to offer is to talk to people who live there and see if they have any recommendations. If you aren’t comfortable talking to strangers, do some online research before you leave and while you’re there. You’re bound to find some local secrets.

    iStock-517349086Use Public Transportation or Walk

    If your destination has a solid public transportation system, use it. Resist the urge to hop in a cab everywhere you go. If you do use a taxi remember that the driver is also a local resident, so ask them some questions about the area. Using public transportation is a great way to experience your destination like the locals do. If the place you’re in is walkable, that’s even better.

    Keep a Journal

    A picture may be worth a thousand words, but it’s still worth jotting down a few of those words in a travel journal. At the end of the day, each day, write down a few highlights and how they made you feel. A travel log can be so much more meaningful and personal than pictures alone.

    Do Something That Scares You

    Travelling is your chance to step outside of your comfort zone and try something you may not try at home. This does not mean taking unnecessary or dangerous risks. Even a small risk can be exhilarating, not to mention teach you something about yourself and what you are capable of.

    Happy (and safe) travels from Timbercreek Communities. We hope you have a great adventure.

    To find your home in one of the many Timbercreek Communities across Canada, please see our website.

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