Petiquette 101: Seasonal Pet Health Hazards Associated with Fall

Oct 24, 2017

We all want to keep our pets safe. There are many seasonal pet health hazards associated with fall. These dangers can lead to serious injury or worse. Luckily for pet owners, most of these hazards can be easily avoided. To help keep your pet safe this fall, Timbercreek has advice for how to avoid the most common fall pet hazards.

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Leaf Piles

Leaf piles offer hours of fun for kids and adults, but the piles can pose hidden dangers to pets and humans. While seemingly soft and delightful, they’re still airy piles of mostly, well, air. And with most of them residing on the street, they often house stones, pieces of metal or broken glass, dirt, and potentially large stones and concrete debris -- not to mention other animals (alive and/or dead!). Though seemingly harmless, keep an eye on your pet as they sniff around leaf piles.

Cars

As kids go back to school, university students return to town, and 9-to-5 workers get back to the grind after summer holidays, traffic increases. In addition, the decreasing daylight that comes with fall means lower visibility in the evenings. Cyclists, pedestrians, and cars all have a harder time spotting animals on the road. For your pet, that means increased danger - especially if they’re outdoor cats, dogs that are used to being off-leash, or pets that have a tendency to run away. A quick walk before bed or a cracked door to get the mail can be the ideal opportunity for your pet to dart out into the street. Keep a watchful eye on your pet this season.

Off-leash Parks

Off-leash parks are usually safe public zones for dogs, but they still require caution from pet owners. Even the most urban of parks have wildlife like squirrels and raccoons, and parks close to water may have turtles, fish, and potentially even skunks. It’s key to keep a close eye on your pet to avoid canine calamity and/or troublemaking.

Seasonal Plant Dangers

The Chrysanthemum is a classic fall flower. It can be toxic if ingested (the flower, stems, or leaves), and may cause Ataxia (stumbling), skin inflammation, Ptyalism (increased salivation), nausea/vomiting, and diarrhea. Other plants producing blooms with a toxic potential for dogs and cats include meadow saffron/autumn crocus and clematis. Mushrooms also appear in fall and some varieties are toxic. If you walk close to forested areas with your pet, have a look around the area for fall mushrooms and the other harmful plants we mentioned above. Learn more here.

Timbercreek hopes that this article helps keep your pets safe and sound this fall. For more information about Timbercreek Communities in your city, please visit our website.

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